Monthly Archives: November 2014

Ep. 11 – 24 Pull Requests (Andrew Nesbitt)



It was just a static webpage, telling you to get in the holiday spirit by making open source contributions. But 24 Pull Requests soon became its own open source project, with people adding features to make it fun and easy to make those contributions. We talk to creator Andrew Nestbitt about how code newbies can get started in making open source contributions, why getting invovled in open source is a great idea, and how to get over the intimidation you might feel at the prospect of making your first pull request.

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Ep. 10 – Nitpicks and Devils (Katrina Owen)



She calls them nitpicks, her term for the code reviews people get on exercism.io. It’s a platform that developer Katrina Owen created to help people get mentorship and feedback on their code. It started as a project for her own students, but grew into something much more. Katrina talks to us about building her platform to help people become better programmers, how she went from being a secretary to studying biology to being a programmer, and how code newbies can make the most of exercism.io.

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Ep. 9 – How to build a product (Poornima Vijayashanker)



Building a web product was a lot harder in 2006 than it is now. Poornima Vijayashanker tells us what it was like to code back in those days as founding engineer at Mint, an app that later sold to Intuit for $170 million. Since then, she’s been helping people better understand the product development process through her blog and company Femgineer. We talk about what code newbies should think about when building a new app, whether for fun or for profit, and how it takes more than code to make a great product.

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Ep. 8 – From Student Project to Big App (William Jeffries)



When William Jeffries had to think of a project to work on as a bootcamp student, he decided to build an app that could detect and report temperatures in apartments when they dropped below a certain degree. His mission was to help people find heat in the winter, and he called it Heat Seek. In a few months, his student project grew past the classroom walls, getting the attention of city officals, entrepreneurs, and citizens excited to help. William tells us how the technology works, how he built the app as he was learning to code himself, and about the mindset that helped him get through the doubts many newbies face.

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